November Taize: Celebrating Native American History Month

Taizé for November: Native American Heritage Month

November is Native American Heritage Month. It is a yearly opportunity to learn about native peoples and cultures, and to celebrate the gifts that they bring to our lives and society. Our November Taizé prayer will incorporate elements of Native American prayer.  We will praise God and pray for healing among nations.

We invite you to join with others in a time of silent prayer to allow yourself to rest in the presence of the God who loves you.

Note: We had some technical difficulties recording this service. Parts are kind of choppy. Apologies. Download a program for the service here: https://www.pbrenewalcenter.org/wp-co..

National Native American Heritage Month celebrates the diverse and rich culture, history, and traditions of Native peoples. The observance is also a time to educate anyone and everyone about the different tribes, raise awareness about the struggles native people faced in the past, as well as in the present. American Indian pictures, words, names, and stories are a crucial part of American history and help mold our life today. Today, there are about 4.5 million Native Americans in the United States, making about 1.5 percent of our population. We are encouraged to take some time to learn about and celebrate their culture this month of November.

Keep Native American Heritage alive this November, and for all the months to follow! Here are a few ways you can celebrate this month.

  1. Read a Native American history book or a novel that dives into the history and traditions of native people. Movies like Pocahontas tend to sensationalize truth about Native American history so reading a book will likely give you a more realistic vision. The Kansas City Public Library has a resource page that includes reading recommendations, films and event videos.
  2. Play a game of lacrosse! Believe it or not, lacrosse was a variety of indigenous stickball games the American Indians played as early as the 12th century.
  3. There are a few movies made about Native Americans that aren’t as over-sensationalized and are definitely worth a watch. Try Reel Injun, Smoke Signals, Bury my Heart at Wounded Knee, and Winter in the Blood.
  4. Get in the kitchen and try a native recipe! There are tons of mouthwatering recipes from native soups, to roasted duck, or even pumpkin bread for a tasty fall treat.
  5. Finally, learn the true story about the very first thanksgiving. What you were taught in elementary school isn’t quite accurate.

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